The Parishudh Sanitation Initiative

Introduction

The Parishudh initiative aims to increase access to sanitation infrastructure in rural Northern Karnataka.

The program began in 2011 October, and has the following goals:

  • Help 10,000 families in North Karnataka have a toilet of their own in 40 villages, and educate at least 100,000 families about having a sustainable toilet of their own

  • Encourage entrepreneurs to get started in the area of building sanitation facilities for the public and to sustain this as businesses in the long run

  • Build reusable artifacts including designs, partnerships and processes to make the initiative easily repeatable elsewhere in India

Parishudh has built more than 11,000 toilets for individual families in the region already. The team has also held awareness programs for more than 200,000 people, such as toilets summits, IEC sessions, competitions for school children, sponsoring youth fests and so on. Parishudh has also created Nirmal Gram Samithis in villages with the intention of helping people to organize and implement other developmental initiatives. The NGOs partnering with Parishudh are SPRED, Indus foundation, RUDISET, Vikas Academy Yadgir and Gram Yuva Seva Sangh Kannal.

Methodology

Parishudh has set up a process for the construction of toilets for rural homes.

Awareness

First, it performs a village-wide awareness event to talk about the problems related to open defecation, and the many benefits of having toilets at home. This awareness event addresses several issues such as privacy concerns, convenience for women and children, the problem of female students dropping out of school when they hit puberty, disease and so on. A survey is done on all villages in the area, and this awareness program is usually attended by 200-300 families.

Cost-sharing

When rural homeowners sign up for the program, a cost-sharing arrangement is set up. Parishudh pays for half the costs of construction, the NREGA program pays for a quarter and the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan program pays the remaining quarter (both are government-backed programs). The total cost of construction of a toilet for one family is R. 15,000 ($240).

Construction

When the payment structure is settled, construction is completed in less than a fortnight, using as much local labor and material as possible. Care is taken to ensure strict standards in design and implementation. The handover happens when construction is completed.


Challenges

1. Parishudh Real-Time Progress Webcaster

How can we design a method for people from all over the world to check in on Parishudh’s progress in real time?

An interesting map, video chat, instant messaging and real-time update mash-up would serve to allow people to see the progress of awareness programs, surveying, construction and hand-overs of completed toilets. This can also serve as an excellent method for people to develop a core understanding of the impact being made by Parishudh, and to contribute their time, money and ideas to its progress and expansion.

Program recommendations – Parishudh maintains a Salesforce account to administer master data of all projects – current, completed and planned. The web app could pull the records from here, build necessary custom reports and automatically update real-time progress on a map. The areas the app could generate reports for include – construction dashboard, awareness campaigns conducted, events planned, families in queue etc. Whereas Salesforce will remain to be a management database, the Parishudh Webcaster will use this database to share progress online.

Sustainability – Parishudh will implement and maintain the app, and take it forward after the hackathon. Interested participants could most definitely continue to work with Parishudh in the future. Volunteers who wish to follow up are welcome!

2. The Nudge App – pushing Government programs to deliver on their promises

How can we nudge government departments who run important development-focused programs to complete their deliverables on time?

Need: One of the reasons why toilet construction in rural areas is not up to speed is that the government incentive announced (of Rs.9,200 or $150 per toilet) is NOT reaching the families on time. Currently, the time to deliver varies anywhere between 30 days to 2 years, with many families still not having received the grant. As a result, people keep postponing construction until they are sure that the money will be disbursed.

Functionality:

A benchmarking application that allows for the following activities would help:

  • Downloads the data from government departments of people who have reported that a toilet is built, or submitted an application for construction

  • Keeps periodically checking the progress related to the application

  • Generates a weekly alert on days it is taking for an application for moving from one stage to another (submitted, approved, inspection due, certified for payment, payment done).

  • Publishes a state wide, district-wise, gram Panchayat-wise comparative performance report. A publicly open comparison of performance would create a sense of urgency in concerned gram Panchayat officials and also create more awareness in people about the benchmark.

The crux here is to build interface with the NIC (National Informatics Center) that maintains the government data.

Sustainability – Parishudh will implement and maintain the app, and take it forward after the hackathon. Interested participants could most definitely continue to work with Parishudh in the future. Volunteers who wish to follow up are welcome!


Images from Parishudh on the field

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